Tuning Lighted Arrow Nocks | Nock Out® Lighted Nocks 

Nock Out® Lighted Nocks | Tuning and Installing Lighted Nocks

Bow hunters have a responsibility to be as efficient and ethical as possible. This means making sure your equipment is tuned before the hunt. You wouldn’t shoot at a game animal without first making sure your new broadheads hit their mark, right?  The same can be said about installing lighted nocks to any hunting arrow setup. You should never add, subtract, or change anything about your bow, your arrow, or your accessories without first testing and tuning your bow. This is standard and common knowledge when it comes to broadheads, new fletching, a new rest, a new sight, a new release, or a new batch of arrows. This should also be extended to installing lighted nocks.  

Factors to Consider 

The fact is that the installing of a lighted nock means the arrow will fly differently than a standard or manufacturer’s arrow nock. Adding a lighted nock, like any other component of an arrow will not only adjust the weight, but the location and distribution of that weight,  the length of the arrow, and other factors to consider as they cause a difference in arrow flight. 

Arrow Nock Weight  

Regular nocks generally weigh between 8 and 16 grains, while contenders can run up to 25 grains, meaning Nock Out® lighted nocks are double the weight of most traditional nocks. This change in weight will impact your arrow’s front-of-center (FOC), requiring you to adjust your setup to compensate for the difference. Remember, the front-of-center helps determine your arrow’s trajectory.  This is especially important when choosing the proper field tips and broadheads.  In most instances, archers will want a higher front of center (more weight forward).  Most manufacturers often recommend an arrow with 10 – 15% FOC when fully assembled (with broadheads).

Weight isn’t the only factor that changes, as this can also affect your length. 

Arrow Nock Length

Length varies between types, brands, and even within brands. For example, the nock length is 1 5/8 for the original Nock Out® lighted nock, and 1 ½ for the Contenders. This difference changes the weight distribution of the arrow, and subsequently, its flight.

 

Indexing Your Arrow  

Finally, you’ll need to know how to properly index your arrow. This is one of the last things you should consider that could significantly alter arrow flight. This should remind you that you should never just insert a lighted nock without first indexing the arrow. The index (or cock) vane should be facing up directly in line with your string if you shoot a whisker biscuit, and down if you shoot a drop away rest.  

Knowing these factors ahead of installing a nock should allow you to shoot lighted nocks without sacrificing accuracy! Follow the information and steps below for installing lighted nocks.  

How to Install Lighted Nocks 

The new Nock Out® Contender and Nock Out® Contender 300 for Crossbows are the new leading lighted nock for the archery industry. The driving forces behind the Nock’s excelling features are the simplicity, strength, and functionality of the nock.  

The Nock Out® Contender comes with 3 black bushings, allowing it to fit X, H, and S/GT arrows.  

  • G nocks fit shafts with a .166-inch inside diameter. 
  • X nocks fit shafts with a .204-inch inside diameter. 
  • H nocks fit shafts with a .234-inch inside diameter. 
  • S nocks ‑ also called Super Nocks ‑ fit shafts with a .244-inch inside diameter. 
  • GT nocks fit shafts with a .246-inch inside diameter. 

Steps for Installing Lighted Nocks 

  • First, remove the regular nock from the arrow with a pair of pliers.  
  • Next, fit the right size bushing into the arrow shaft or in the case of X-nocks, the Contender directly into the shaft without the bushing.  
  • Next, you will want to install the Nock Out® Contender and index it so that the arrow vanes are properly aligned to your rest. This is also assuming that your broadhead and vanes are properly indexed. Improper nock indexing could cause improper arrow flight or contact with your arrow rest. This is especially true if you have long and/or helical vanes. The index (or cock) vane should be facing up directly in line with your string if you shoot a whisker biscuit, and down if you shoot a drop away rest.  
  • Once your nock is properly indexed in accordance with your vane, broadhead and rest, you are ready to sight the bow in.  
  • Sight the bow in like normal, adjusting the bow sight housing and pins in accordance with the yardage you wish to reference.

Ensuring your equipment is as accurate as possible is your ethical responsibility as a bow hunter. This includes your responsibility to realize the addition or subtraction of any gear, accessory, or arrow feature can and does alter accuracy.

Want more information? Check out the links below to find out more about Nock Out® lighted nocks or tuning your bow!

 

In-Depth Bow Tuning | 5 Steps to the Perfect Setup

Bow Tuning Steps

As hunters, it’s our ethical responsibility to make sure our gear is ready, deadly, and going to perform as accurately as possible. This means not only having dependable gear but having a “tuned” setup that we can trust in the field.  Bow tuning should be at the core of our hunting values. 

Most people understand that their gear needs to be tuned occasionally, to ensure that it is functioning at its best. In reality, gear needs to be tuned frequently. Change arrows? Tune it. Change nocks? Tune it. Change broadheads? Tune it. Drop your bow? Tune it. Haven’t shot in a few weeks? Tune it!  

As you can tell, tuning shouldn’t be a one and done deal.  It should be a consistent process that you follow every time you change, damage, or upgrade your equipment. It should be implemented into everyone’s bow hunting routine. That’s why we have put together an in-depth guide detailing exactly what you should be focusing on and why.   If any of your equipment is not up to par, it’s your responsibility as a hunter to buy the right gear, understand it, tune, and test it. Let this article guide you on your way.

Step 1Understand Your Equipment

A properly tuned bow requires you to understand what needs to be adjusted and why. This means knowing your gear and how it will affect your arrow’s flight. Below we go through each piece of equipment, detailing what you should be aware of and how to address it.

Your Bow 

Before you can tune anything, you have to make sure your mainstay piece is ready to go. A few things you should think about: 

  •  Did your string stretch?  
  • Are the cams aligned?  
  • Is your draw length appropriate?  

Strings and cables stretch over time, meaning mistimed cams, out of place peep sites, and too long of draw lengths. Adjustments can be easily made to remedy this.  You can either twist your bow string back down to its original length or adjust your equipment to compensate for the change.

 

Hunting Arrows 

Shooting the right arrow is a huge factor when trying to be consistent in the field. Too often, people buy the wrong arrow and waste significant time trying to site in their equipment, without ever knowing that their arrow is to blame.  

That’s why we recommend you refer to our Arrow Buying Guide before making any arrow purchases. 

For the purpose of this article, we have summarized the basics below:  

  • Arrow length: In general, shorter arrows are faster; longer arrows are safer.  Finding a happy medium can be done by pulling back your arrow to full draw and having an assistant measure a distance between 1-½” and 2” from the rest.  
  • Arrow stiffness: Higher speed bows generally require a stiffer arrow while slower bows will respond well to a flexible arrow.  Make sure to use the chart from your manufacturer to find the correct arrow for your setup.  
  • Arrow weight: As a general rule of thumb, a heavier arrow will penetrate an animal better, but a shorter arrow will be faster. Make sure you practice with the weight you will plan to kill with.  
  • Type of fletching: Fletching comes in multiple different lengths. However, the blazer vanes have become the standard.  Remember, the vanes and broadheads are dependent on each other. The bigger the vane, the heavier the broadhead can be. 
  • Fletching position: How you align your fletching will influence the way it moves during flight. There are three common alignments: straight, helical, and offset.  The most common is offset, which creates a relatively resilient arrow path (both fast and forgiving).  

As previously mentioned, the best way to tackle your arrows is by referring to our guide.

 

Step 2: Aligning Your Peep, Rest, and Nocking Point 

The next step is to make sure your arrow will be lined up with the center of the bow.  This means making sure your nocking point and rest are properly aligned, therefore allowing your arrow to be “centered”.  This is often called finding the center shot.   

There are numerous ways you can do this, including measuring your bow, or using a bow square. However, using a simple laser center-shot tool will work well and save you time.  

Here is how to set up a laser center-shot tool: 

  • Simply line up the laser where your site would be and center the laser on the bow string.  
  • When the laser is centered on the bowstring you can lock it in place.  
  • Next, you’ll want to have an arrow mounted on your rest without locking the rest in place.   
  • Once you have an arrow and a rest in place you’ll want to turn the laser on and align it with your arrow shaft. If the laser aligns with the shaft, the rest is in its proper place. If not, adjust it so it is. 
  • Tighten your rest and you are done! Your arrow should be at its true center shot.  

Next, you will want to make sure your peep site is located in a comfortable position. Too often, people find that they are lowering their heads to see through their site.  This is an uncomfortable position that will affect your form and consistency.  

To remedy this, close your eyes and draw your bow back to your anchor position. When you open your eyes, you should be looking through your peep site comfortably. If not, adjust and try again.  You’ll then want to reattach or attach a new site (if applicable). Specific site setups are beyond the scope of this article. However, when attaching any site, remember that a site closer to the riser is easier to keep on target while a site farther from the riser will be more accurate. In addition, make sure your pins are aligned with a nocked arrow and the string. 

If you don’t have the right equipment (such as a bow press, bow square, or laser), don’t be afraid to bring your gear to your local shop. They can help inspect your strings and make any proper adjustments. Knowing that your gear is in good shape will boost your confidence and make the tuning process easier.

 

Arrow Nocks

Many people forget the significance the nock has on arrow flight. Using the right nock for your setup is important. Therefore, when looking for one, we recommend using our Nock Out Contenders. 

Why go lighted? Not only do lighted nocks reduce the risk of losing your arrows and your game, but they also help with fine tuning your bow. They make arrow flight patterns easy to identify, helping you tune your equipment with ease.   

However, with nontraditional technology comes nontraditional specs.  One of the biggest changes between traditional and lighted nocks is the nock weight.

Regular nocks generally weigh between 8 and 16 grains, while contenders can run up to 25 grains, meaning Nock Out® lighted nocks are double the weight of most traditional nocks. This change in weight will impact your arrow’s front-of-center (FOC), requiring you to adjust your setup to compensate for the difference. Remember, the front-of-center helps determine your arrow’s trajectory.  This is especially important when choosing the proper field tips and broadheads.  In most instances, archers will want a higher front of center (more weight forward).  Most manufacturers often recommend an arrow with 10 – 15% FOC when fully assembled (with broadheads).

 

Weight isn’t the only factor that changes, as this can also affect your length. Length varies between types, brands, and even within brands. For example, the nock length is 1 5/8th for the original Nock Out® lighted nock, and 1 ½ for the Contenders. This difference changes the weight distribution of the arrow, and subsequently, its flight. 

Finally, you’ll need to know how to properly index your arrow. The index (or cock) vane should be facing up directly in line with your string if you shoot a whisker biscuit, and down if you shoot a drop away rest.  

The Nock Out® Contender comes with 3 black bushings, allowing it to fit X, H, and S/GT arrows.  

  • G nocks fit shafts with a .166-inch inside diameter. 
  • X nocks fit shafts with a .204-inch inside diameter. 
  • H nocks fit shafts with a .234-inch inside diameter. 
  • S nocks  also called Super Nocks  fit shafts with a .244-inch inside diameter. 
  • GT nocks fit shafts with a .246-inch inside diameter. 

Make sure to find the Nock Out that is most suited for your setup.  

Your Broadheads & Field Tips 

Finding the proper broadheads and field tips should come after assembling the rest of your arrow.  This is because your field tip and broadhead weight will depend on what your FOC (front of center) will need to be. This is where the nock weight becomes incredibly important.   

When picking the right broadheads, try to shoot for the 10% to 15% FOC. Why? Because you will have relatively balanced penetration and trajectory. An arrow with too much weight forward will fall too fast, and an arrow with too much weight behind will lose force and accuracy.

Weigh Your Arrow 

After you have properly assembled arrows, you are going to want to weigh and spin them. Remember when we mentioned the different arrow weights, nock weights, and vanes will influence your arrow flight? Weighing your arrows will tell you if each arrow is assembled and flying the same, therefore making your groups more accurate.  

Make sure you weigh and spin test each arrow after assembly and before paper tuning. 

Know your equipment, understand why you have the equipment you do, and then you’ll be ready to fine-tune your setup.

Step 3: Paper Tune

Once your equipment is properly setup, you are going to want to paper tune your gear to iron out any minor issues.   Keep in mind, paper tuning doesn’t work if you don’t know what to adjust.  

Paper tuning should be used as a method of finding any minor problems.  

Below are a few of the basic steps to paper tuning your bow setup.  

  • Find a piece of paper, backstop, and be ready to shoot approximately six to eight feet away from it.  
  • To find out which adjustments need to be made, the arrow needs to shoot all of the way through the paper. Therefore, be sure to set your backstop far enough away.  
  • When shooting, focus on form. Bad form can compromise the entire test.  
  • After shooting, analyze the shape in the paper. A perfect tear means your bow is properly tuned.

Step 4: Sighting In

Once everything is aligned, you’ll finally get to sight in your bow!  If your gear is aligned correctly and paper tuned, sighting in should be a simple process.  

As mentioned previously, sighting in for any particular site is beyond the scope of this article. However, for a general reference, follow the steps below.  

Start by sighting your first pin at your chosen distance (usually 20 yards). You can always take your first few shots within 20 yards if you are worried that your shot will be significantly off.   

If you shoot high, move your pin higher.  If you shoot low move your pin lower. The same goes for left and right. “Follow your arrow” is the general term used when adjusting your site.  

Be sure to site in over the course of days or even weeks. Shooting too much at any given time will result in fatigue and influence the accuracy of your shot.  There will also be days where your form varies, or you simply perform better than others. Therefore, be sure to give yourself enough time to properly sight in before hitting the field.   

Step 5: Stay Consistent 

Your consistency out of the field will affect your consistency on the field. Therefore, checking your equipment, paper tuning, and making regular adjustments are crucial to your success as a bow hunter. It not only improves your bows performance but provides you with confidence when making any shot. Being responsible both on and off the stand is what makes a bow hunter great. 

For more information on archery equipment and hunting tactics, be sure to visit our Nock Out In Action blog.

 

 

Lighted Nocks | Legal for Bow Hunting Except One State

Lighted Nocks | Legal Status, Controversy, and the Debate

Feature Photo: John Arman

Lighted nocks were introduced to archers in 2002, but the innovations’ popularity didn’t automatically take off as a bow hunting favorite. There was controversy from the beginning that the addition of this new technological innovation constituted a violation of the Pope and Young Club By-laws of the principle of fair chase. The Pope and Young Club coined a standard ethical term of hunting as “Fair Chase,” as well as bow hunting equipment definitions to meet the fair chase standard. Until 2014, the Club prohibited lighted nocks, but the amended Club’s By-laws read:  

“The term ‘Fair Chase’ shall NOT include the taking of animals under the following conditions: By the use of electronic devices for attracting, locating, or pursuing game or guiding the hunter to such game, or by the use of a bow or arrow to which any electronic device is attached with the exception of lighted nocks and recording devices that cast no light towards the target and do not aid in range finding, sighting or shooting the bow.” 

Why are these by-laws so important? The Pope and Young Club is the registry and recordation of national trophy harvests, therefore the Club’s By-laws govern acceptability of animals into the record books. This fact alone was enough to make many hunters refrain from using lighted nocks when they were prohibited because that once-in-a-lifetime trophy would be disqualified from being recognized in the Club’s record book.

 Photo: Flatline Whitetails

The Controversy and Debate of Lighted Nocks

Traditional archers favor the argument against lighted nocks, weighed on preserving the heritage of traditional archery hunting. For many, traditional bow hunting is an invigorating challenge of pursuing game with basic necessities; of which lighted nocks are often shunned upon. Another reason lighted nocks were not favored by archers is the fact that the earlier designs did not work flawlessly and were often very hard to turn off after being engaged. The earlier designs often added more than 20 grains to the trailing end of arrows affecting its flight out beyond 30 yards. Many bow hunters experienced the nocks illuminating in the quiver when stalking or movement of the quiver. There were also instances of hunters experiencing total failure of the nock illuminating at all after the shot. Advanced technology and design have solved many of the issues that were previously plaguing the interest in lighted nocks. 

Compound bows and crossbows have come a long way over the past two decades, and pin sights, energy storing cams, technical releases, and crossbow scopes have increased the odds for hunters. The argument by proponents of lighted nocks has always been that, before the actual shot, lighted nocks do not provide a favorable condition to archers that would give the archer an unfair advantage. Even with that fact, many states stood by their decision to not legalize the use of lighted nocks for hunting game animals until the controversies were combed over and a debate resolution was on the horizon.

A major breakthrough for the legality of lighted nocks occurred in August of 2014 when the Pope and Young Club amended its by-laws. The “Fair Chase” definition above was amended to include lighted nocks and recording devices and the Club’s definition of bow hunting equipment was amended to read: 

“Section II. Definition of a Hunting Arrow, Subsection B. Exclusions, Item 1. No electronic or battery-powered devices shall be attached to the arrow, with the exception of lighted nocks.” 

Lighted Nock Legal Status By State 

Before 2015, there were five states that prohibited the hunting of game within the state with lighted nocks. Those states were: 

  • Colorado
  • Idaho
  • Montana
  • Oregon
  • Washington 

In 2014, the Colorado Parks & Wildlife considered a Citizen-Proposed Issue for the “legalization of the use of lighted nocks on arrows and recording devices on bows,” and the proposal was accepted, legalizing the use of lighted nocks in the state of Colorado beginning in 2015. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife followed suit, adopting the 2016 big game hunting regulations that “Archery hunters may use lighted nocks which have no other function other than to increase the visibility of the arrow and help hunters track wounded game.”

 

Photo Credit:  Steven Badar & Daniel Merrell

 

This year, Montana and Washington both legalized the use of lighted nocks after several years of the issue being proposed in both states and presented to the state agencies for commission review and consideration. The recent legalization in both these states leaves just one state that has not accepted the use of lighted nocks to hunt game animals; that state is Idaho 

Idaho is the only state that currently does not accept the use of lighted nocks to hunt game animals.

 

Lighted Nock Advantages 

The advantages of lighted nocks are a huge asset in assisting you as a bow hunter in tuning arrows during practice for precision shooting. It is much easier to notice fish-tailing and porpoising when you can visually see the arrow’s flight. Lighted nocks also assist in determining the placement of your shot on wild game. If there is a pass-through, lighted nocks can assist you in quickly locating the arrow for inspection of body fluids such as blood, bile, or bowel matter; this information is critical to the plan of retrieval of game. Without a full pass-through, the small beacon of light emitted from a lighted nock can truly be a saving grace for retrieving game; particularly in high grass, thick brush, or thickly wooded areas.

With advanced technological innovation and designs, such as that of Nock Out® Lighted Nocks, you can trust that you will have a frustration-free experience using lighted nocks. The high-quality, aircraft aluminum design adds a minimal amount of weight to the trailing end of arrows, and the polycarbonate nock is durable in the toughest of conditions. With a fail-proof performance, archers are sure to favor Nock Out® Lighted Nocks in assisting in the tuning of bow and arrow combinations during practice, and in assisting in planning game retrieval in the field. The advantages of lighted nocks far outweigh any disadvantages, technically and particularly on an ethical level. 

Arrow Buying Guide | What You Need To Know

Nock Out® | Guide to Buying Hunting Arrows

Being an informed bow hunter is part of our ethical code. This includes buying equipment that we know can do the job and do it well.  Buying hunting arrows that fit our setup is essential. Unfortunately, hunters often end up purchasing the first set of arrows that they lay their eyes on. This quick decision can be costly when arrows don’t fly right and game is lost. Therefore, it should be known that finding the right arrow can be just as important as finding the right bow. There are several elements that every hunter needs to know before purchasing hunting arrows. This ranges from the basics to the finer details of a shooters form.  Knowledge truly is power in bow hunting.  Our Guide to Buying Hunting Arrows is the perfect solution for making an informed purchase.

 

Remember, purchasing the correct arrow for your setup can make or break your next hunt.

Hunting Arrow Basics

An arrow has four main parts: a nock, fletching, a shaft, and a tip.  You can purchase arrows assembled, or you can assemble them on your own. All four parts come in different sizes, weights, and have unique features.  All of these differences will impact the arrow’s flight.

Arrow flight is also dependent on numerous other factors including arrow weight, shaft length, draw length, draw poundage, bow accessories, speed, and the environmental conditions.  Once these concepts are fully understood, you can utilize a system of measurements and charts to find your perfect setup.

Draw Length

One of the first things to consider when going through the arrow purchasing process is measuring your bow’s draw length. The draw length will directly influence the performance of the arrow you will purchase.  

Many times, hunters shoot too long of a draw length.  Whether it be by mistake, or the desire to gain speed, having too long of length can cause serious form issues. Keep in mind, no equipment can fix poor form.  

If you aren’t sure what your draw length should be (or you simply forgot), you can find it by measuring your full arm span and dividing it by 2.5.

Draw Weight

The next important factor to consider is draw weight. The greater the draw weight means higher speed and penetration (all else being equal).  However, don’t increase weight at the cost of your form. When archers have too high of a draw weight, they become over bowed and their shot becomes negatively affected. 

You’ll need to know your draw weight to determine your arrow spine. However, remember to keep your weight comfortable and don’t get too caught up in the speed factor.

Photo: Flatline Whitetails

Hunting Arrow Length

Many people will use their draw length as a standard for their arrow length.  Although this works, there is a better way.  

Because different rests have different specifications, it’s better to measure arrow length by drawing your bow with a nocked arrow.  Make sure to have somebody assist you with the measurement.  When most people think of arrow length, they consider the following: 

  • Shorter arrows are faster 
  • Longer arrows are safer 

To find your proper draw length, pull back your arrow to full draw and have an assistant measure a distance between 1-½” and 2” from the rest. Keep in mind, an arrow that falls too short can cause you to shoot through your hand.  

Some experienced archers prefer a shorter length for speed. Don’t cut your arrows for this reason unless you fully understand the repercussions of a short arrow.

Hunting Arrow Weight

As a general rule of thumb, medium to heavy weighted arrows serve hunters better for two main reasons.  

  • A heavier arrow will penetrate the deer better 
  • Heavier arrows reduce noise and vibration  

However, many archers still choose to shoot lighter arrows because they are faster. Below are some general guidelines when considering arrow weight. 

  • Lighter arrows are sufficient for competition 
  • Heavier arrows are better for hunting 
  • Hunters should use between 6 to 8 grain per pound of draw weight  

Never shoot an arrow lighter than 5-grains per pound of draw weight.  Shooting too light of an arrow can harm your bow and potentially void your warranty. Also keep in mind that weight measurements include your entire setup (shaft, vanes, nock, tips, and insert). For archers shooting a lower draw weight, say 50# or less, it’s recommended to shoot an arrow on the heavier side of that range.

Shopping hunting arrows online at eastonhunting.com. Easy, fast, and great arrows!

Arrow Spine Rating

The spine rating could be considered the most important aspect of an arrow.  By definition, it’s considered the “stiffness.” However, it’s much more complex than that. Using the wrong chart or an unfamiliar setup can result in having an arrow that doesn’t shoot straight.  

Spine rating is complicated for a few big reasons: 

  •  It’s dependent on numerous variables 
  • Charts and ratings differ between manufacturers 

Unfortunately, the lack of a universal chart makes things very difficult for new archers.  There are two common ways to look at stiffness: dynamically and statically. Static spine rating is a standard method for determining arrow stiffness.  It is done by taking an 880-grain weight and using it to bend a 28” arrow. 

However, everybody shoots different length arrows, variously weighted bows, and have entirely different setups.  All of these various factors will impact the desired stiffness of the shaft.  This is considered the “dynamic” aspect of stiffness. 

Despite the differences in ratings, there is usually a general pattern between arrow stiffness ratings: the smaller the number, the stiffer the arrow.  For example, a 400-grain arrow will be stiffer than a 500-grain arrow according to the static standards.  However, this isn’t always the case when shooting a bow with different weight to different length ratios. Other factors such as bow speed, string type, and rest also can influence dynamic spine ratings.  Don’t forget that a 400-grain arrow from one brand is different than a 400-grain arrow from another.

Photo: Flatline Whitetails

Although there is no perfect method, be sure to always refer to your manufacturer’s spine chart.  This will take into account your draw weight and draw length as mentioned above.  This can help assure that you make the most appropriate purchase for your setup.

Arrow Fletching

There are three common types of vane lengths.  These are 2”, 3”, and 4”.  Although you could find vanes sized between those measurements, these are considered the standards. Picking a vane will depend on your broadhead setup (or perhaps picking a broadhead will depend on your vane setup), so pick carefully.  Here are the biggest considerations: 

  •  A longer vane allows greater broadhead stabilization.  
  • A shorter vane is more forgiving in the wind. 
  • Longer vanes work better with large, fixed blade broadheads.  
  • Mechanical broadheads will allow you to shoot nearly any vanes.  

Also, note that how an arrow is fletched (how it is turned on the shaft) is just as important as the type of fletching itself. There are three standards:

Straight

A straight position allows for an arrow to have the least resistance during flight. This will yield the highest speed but also the greatest variance of the three positions.  A straight position is best for competition shooters where environmental conditions are irrelevant, and the bow is perfectly tuned.  

 Helical 

The helical position is the most forgiving.  It allows your arrows to rotate during flight, improving arrow stabilization and accuracy at greater distances. Although this would be the ideal setup for most hunters, it isn’t always appropriate.  

Some arrow rests won’t allow the arrow to be cleared when positioned helically.  

Offset 

An offset is a mix of the two. It’s the most common for this reason. 

You can learn more about fletching arrows by referring to our Fletching the Perfect Hunting Arrow for your Bow Hunting Setup article.

 

Arrow Nocks

There are many different features to consider when purchasing nocks.  They not only come in all different sizes and varieties, they also differ in quality.  However, there is one thing you can do to improve every shot:  buying lighted nocks. This not only helps when fine tuning your bow, but it can eliminate the chance of losing arrows and losing harvested game. Thankfully, Nock Out® has you covered. Nock Out® Lighted Nocks are lightweight, bright, and reliable. They are a perfect all-in-one solution when you are looking for that nock for your perfect setup. 

Other Hunting Arrow Tips and Considerations

As most of you are aware, you will need to purchase two types of tips. One type to practice and one type to hunt. They should be the same weight to assure proper tuning.   

Broadheads  

There are two types of broadheads: mechanical and fixed blade. 

Mechanical 

These broadheads expand during the shot.  The compacted point reduces surface area and increases speed and accuracy. However, you risk the chance of them NOT growing, which is particularly common with low poundage bows. 

Fixed Blade

Fixed blade broadheads have greater surface area and more weight.  Therefore, their flight isn’t as accurate, but they are more reliable for those shooting lighter poundage.  

Also, don’t forget the relationship between the broadheads and fletching that we discussed earlier. Smaller fletching works better with mechanical and small fixed blade broadheads.  The heavier the broadhead, the larger the fletching. 

Field Tips

The biggest key to purchasing field tips is shooting the same grain as your broadheads.  Also, make sure that you shoot the same arrow and the same setup during practice.  Doing this will improve your odds of executing the shot when it matters the most.  

Final Considerations

Having a strong understanding of your archery setup and your goals can not only improve your accuracy but completely modify your shooting experience. It will change the way you make purchases.  Not every shop owner is going to treat you right, and far too often hunters are convinced to buy a setup that isn’t good for them. However, now that you know what to look for when purchasing your arrow equipment, you can make the best possible purchase for your performance and your wallet.  

For a more in-depth review on arrow anatomy, be sure to check out our article “What You Should Know About Your Hunting Arrows.