Tuning Lighted Arrow Nocks | Nock Out® Lighted Nocks 

Nock Out® Lighted Nocks | Tuning and Installing Lighted Nocks

Bow hunters have a responsibility to be as efficient and ethical as possible. This means making sure your equipment is tuned before the hunt. You wouldn’t shoot at a game animal without first making sure your new broadheads hit their mark, right?  The same can be said about installing lighted nocks to any hunting arrow setup. You should never add, subtract, or change anything about your bow, your arrow, or your accessories without first testing and tuning your bow. This is standard and common knowledge when it comes to broadheads, new fletching, a new rest, a new sight, a new release, or a new batch of arrows. This should also be extended to installing lighted nocks.  

Factors to Consider 

The fact is that the installing of a lighted nock means the arrow will fly differently than a standard or manufacturer’s arrow nock. Adding a lighted nock, like any other component of an arrow will not only adjust the weight, but the location and distribution of that weight,  the length of the arrow, and other factors to consider as they cause a difference in arrow flight. 

Arrow Nock Weight  

Regular nocks generally weigh between 8 and 16 grains, while contenders can run up to 25 grains, meaning Nock Out® lighted nocks are double the weight of most traditional nocks. This change in weight will impact your arrow’s front-of-center (FOC), requiring you to adjust your setup to compensate for the difference. Remember, the front-of-center helps determine your arrow’s trajectory.  This is especially important when choosing the proper field tips and broadheads.  In most instances, archers will want a higher front of center (more weight forward).  Most manufacturers often recommend an arrow with 10 – 15% FOC when fully assembled (with broadheads).

Weight isn’t the only factor that changes, as this can also affect your length. 

Arrow Nock Length

Length varies between types, brands, and even within brands. For example, the nock length is 1 5/8 for the original Nock Out® lighted nock, and 1 ½ for the Contenders. This difference changes the weight distribution of the arrow, and subsequently, its flight.


Indexing Your Arrow  

Finally, you’ll need to know how to properly index your arrow. This is one of the last things you should consider that could significantly alter arrow flight. This should remind you that you should never just insert a lighted nock without first indexing the arrow. The index (or cock) vane should be facing up directly in line with your string if you shoot a whisker biscuit, and down if you shoot a drop away rest.  

Knowing these factors ahead of installing a nock should allow you to shoot lighted nocks without sacrificing accuracy! Follow the information and steps below for installing lighted nocks.  

How to Install Lighted Nocks 

The new Nock Out® Contender and Nock Out® Contender 300 for Crossbows are the new leading lighted nock for the archery industry. The driving forces behind the Nock’s excelling features are the simplicity, strength, and functionality of the nock.  

The Nock Out® Contender comes with 3 black bushings, allowing it to fit X, H, and S/GT arrows.  

  • G nocks fit shafts with a .166-inch inside diameter. 
  • X nocks fit shafts with a .204-inch inside diameter. 
  • H nocks fit shafts with a .234-inch inside diameter. 
  • S nocks ‑ also called Super Nocks ‑ fit shafts with a .244-inch inside diameter. 
  • GT nocks fit shafts with a .246-inch inside diameter. 

Steps for Installing Lighted Nocks 

  • First, remove the regular nock from the arrow with a pair of pliers.  
  • Next, fit the right size bushing into the arrow shaft or in the case of X-nocks, the Contender directly into the shaft without the bushing.  
  • Next, you will want to install the Nock Out® Contender and index it so that the arrow vanes are properly aligned to your rest. This is also assuming that your broadhead and vanes are properly indexed. Improper nock indexing could cause improper arrow flight or contact with your arrow rest. This is especially true if you have long and/or helical vanes. The index (or cock) vane should be facing up directly in line with your string if you shoot a whisker biscuit, and down if you shoot a drop away rest.  
  • Once your nock is properly indexed in accordance with your vane, broadhead and rest, you are ready to sight the bow in.  
  • Sight the bow in like normal, adjusting the bow sight housing and pins in accordance with the yardage you wish to reference.

Ensuring your equipment is as accurate as possible is your ethical responsibility as a bow hunter. This includes your responsibility to realize the addition or subtraction of any gear, accessory, or arrow feature can and does alter accuracy.

Want more information? Check out the links below to find out more about Nock Out® lighted nocks or tuning your bow!


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